Diet Sprays and Drops

Diet Sprays and Drops
Want your apple to taste like chocolate?

Diet sprays and drops are the newest technology to help people consume fewer calories in the hope of losing weight. These concentrated liquids bring big flavor to foods without greatly increasing the caloric load. From calorie-free flavor sprays to low-calorie salad dressings and drops that claim to help burn calories and fat, there are all sorts of diet sprays and drops out there to tempt consumers.

About Diet Sprays and Drops

Diet sprays usually involve some kind of flavor that is sprayed on food to make it more appealing or to add a traditional flavor without the fat and calories. Another version of the diet spray is diet salad dressing sold in dispensers that spray one-calorie spritzes onto your food so you can easily control how much you are adding.

The diet drop idea is more controversial. Diet drops are usually just herbal weight loss products delivered in drop form. Use about 10 drops a day, the retailers claim, and you'll curb cravings, lose weight and increase your metabolism. These products seem to fall more often into the category of fad diet products rather than a legitimate weight-loss aid.

Diet Drops

The most popular of the diet drops and sprays is a product called Flavor Spray. Developed by Culinary Institute of America-trained chef David Burke, the sprays are fat-free, cholesterol-free, carb-free and calorie-free.

The idea is that, instead of using high-fat gravies, sauces and cheeses on your foods, just spraying a little bit of flavor spray will give you the same taste experience without the calories and fat, making it an easy way to cut calories and lose weight.

With more than 30 different flavors, ranging from teriyaki to cheddar cheese, apple pie to kiwi, caramelized onion to Memphis BBQ, there are flavors for just about every meal or snack.

Users say the sprays are a great way to deal with cravings while losing weight.

Diet Salad Sprays

A more mainstream version of this idea is the salad dressing spray. Marketed by Wish-Bone, Salad Spritzers are available in seven flavors, including red wine vinaigrette, French, Italian and Caesar.

One spray of the dressing is about a calorie. A serving of ten sprays for most of the dressings has ten calories and is said to be enough for one cup of salad greens. Fat, sodium and carbohydrate levels vary between the products. The Caesar dressing has 15 calories per serving.

If you can stick faithfully to ten sprays, these products offer much of the flavor of more fattening dressings without all the fat and calories.

Diet Drops

Diet sprays and drops, as mentioned earlier, are two different products. While the diet sprays could have use in a diet plan, diet drops are more like weight loss supplements that promise rapid weight loss, but in most cases aren't effective.

Diet drops aren't evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration for safety or effectiveness. They may not even contain the ingredients that they claim on the label. The makers of these products make big promises about how their products will help you lose weight and boost your metabolism with no effort, but weight loss doesn't work that way.

The best course of action when considering these diet drops is to save your money and spend more time researching a diet plan that will work for you.

Diet Sprays and Drops